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Guy Hotson
hotson.guy@gmail.com
Research Group:
Brain Computer Interfaces & Neuroprostheses
About: My research is on real-time brain-machine interfaces for cortical control of upper limb neuroprosthetics. I am developing a framework for the probabilistic fusion of decoded cortical dynamics with environmental sensors.
 
 
Griffin Misap
griffin.milsap@gmail.com
Research Group:
Brain Computer Interfaces & Neuroprostheses
About: I am currently working on speech decoding with the express purpose of developing a speech brain computer interface (BCI). My long term research interests revolve around novel HCI applications of invasive/noninvasive EEG, and the application of BCI to games and music.
 
 
Janaka Senarathna, MS
dsenara1@jhu.edu
Research Group:
NeuroImaging
About: My research involves building miniaturized opto-electronic systems. Specifically, I am interested in developing optical theory for novel microscopy and designing small-footprint optical systems for imaging.
 
 
Luke Osborn, MS
losborn@jhu.edu
Research Group:
Brain Computer Interfaces & Neuroprostheses
About: I am interested in using tactile feedback to enhance upper limb prostheses. My focus is on developing a system with embedded sensors to create a closed-loop system that enhances the functionality and stability of prosthetic hands as well as sockets.
 
 
Joseph Betthauser
jbettha1@jhu.edu
Research Group:
Brain Computer Interfaces & Neuroprostheses
About: I am interested in decoding surface and intramuscular EMG signal for simultaneous and proportional multi-DOF control of upper limb prosthesis.Points of interest include DSP and pattern rec for decoding, adaptive learning models for control, and the improvement of EMG sensor designs (e.g. approach intramuscular signal feature quality with surface electrodes). I hope to develop non-invasive techniques for enhancing the utility of upper limb prostheses for amputee patients, thereby improving their quality of life. My current work is focused on simultaneous and proportional wrist rotation and grasp for trans-radial amputees.
 
 
Damini Aggarwal
dagarwa6@jhu.edu
Research Group:
Brain Computer Interfaces & Neuroprostheses
About: I am pursuing a Masters of Science and Engineering in Biomedical Engineering. Currently, I am working on developing a flexible conformal electrode assembly for EMG acquisition to control a myoelectric upper limb prosthetic arm. My other research interests include design of medical devices and medical instrumentation.
 
 
Ernest So
so.ernest@gmail.com
Research Group:
Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging
About: Diabetic Retinopathy is a complication of Diabetes which can lead to vision loss as a result of changes in the blood vessels of the eye. Early detection is critical in preventing vision loss; however, current methods of evaluating the health of the blood vessels in the eye are invasive and require an eye specialist to perform. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive method of imaging modality that can measure the flow of blood and therefore visualize the blood vessels in the eye. Low light intensities must be used to image the eye to avoid damaging the eye, but this results in poor images. My research is to develop a more sensitive image sensor specialized for this imaging modality to attain high quality, low noise images of the retina in low light conditions.
 
 
Gyorgy Levay
gyorgy.levay@gmail.com
Research Group:
Brain Computer Interfaces & Neuroprostheses
About: I'm interested in control algorithms for pattern recognition based control of prostheses using surface EMG. My main focus is on integrating user feedback into machine learning in an effort to both make the control as efficient as possible and to connect the users with their prosthetic devices through communication.
 
 
Juhi Baskar
jbaskar2@jhu.edu
Research Group:
Brain Computer Interfaces & Neuroprostheses
About: I am a second year Masterís student in the BME program, currently developing a method of simultaneous and proportional control of multi-DOF wrist movements in myoelectric upper limb prostheses using a combination of intramuscular and surface EMG signals. I am also interested in developing wearable technologies that would enable better monitoring of a patientís health both within and outside the hospital, leading to an improvement in overall health care.
 
 
 
   

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